Quiet Meadow Bundle Pocket Front Card

Pocket front card using the Meadows dies from the Quiet Meadow bundle from Stampin' Up! Image shows card standing.
Quiet Meadow Pocket Card – Standing

This Pocket Front Card idea came from a Splitcoast Stampers post. I thought the design would be the perfect final card in my 100 Days Project on Instagram. The project was a challenge to create something for one hundred days. I chose cards. It took me a few more than one hundred days to finish, but I enjoyed the process. This card is not one I would make for an everyday occasion, and I’ll need to craft a custom envelope for it because it is quite large. But I can see this design as a gift card holder or a cute Christmas card with a less elaborate collection in the v-shaped pocket.

How to Make the Pocket Front Card

A Pocket front card filled with die cuts from the Quiet Meadow bundle by Stampin' Up! accented with dragonflies.
The Pocket Card resting flat

The tutorial for this card on Splitcoast Stampers is excellent. It starts with a standard half sheet of card stock scored at 4-1/4″. Then, with the card in landscape position, the two corners are scored from 2-3/4″ up the side to 2-3/4″ in the midpoint of the front. These fold back, and with a small piece of washi tape to hold them in place, become the v-shaped pocket. One thing I added to my card was a 4″x 5-1/4″ piece of Basic White card stock to the front of the card. You can’t tell because the corners are covered with patterned paper. But it leaves a nice little spot for a sentiment and a note.

For the insides of the pocket, I cut a bunch of the flowers and leaves using the Meadow dies and Mossy Meadow, Soft Succulent, Bumblebee, Daffodil Delight, So Saffron, and Blackberry Bliss card stock. I arranged my newly cut meadow in a balanced and pleasing layout to my eye. Then I added the butterflies using the same dies and Calypso Coral paper.

Next, I added the sentiment, stamped in Blackberry Bliss and die cut with the same dies, to the front of the card with Dimensionals. Lastly, I added punched dragonflies from the Dandy Garden paper. This is the same packet of DSP that I used for the front of the card. There are even little Blackberry Bliss dragonflies playing among the petals. Finally, for a touch of sparkle, I finished with some gold Metallic Pearls.

This is a very special occasion type of card, but it was fun to use all the dies and so many colors. I love the final effect. Big thanks to Dina Kowal for her excellent tutorial. Until next time…Ink up!

Four-Fold CASE with Dandy Garden DSP

This Four-Fold card blew me away when my sister demonstrator, Carrie Todd, showed it at the recent Stampin’ Up! event. I begged her for the instructions, and she was so kind to share them with me. And now, I’m sharing with you. This design is so awesome when you have a pack of patterned paper you love. Show it off using this creative fun fold.

The Front of the Card and the Basic Instructions

Four-fold card folded up. This one uses the Dandy Garden DSP from Stampin' Up!
Front of the Four-Fold card with Dandy Garden DSP

First, let’s cover all the card stock you need to cut for this card. Once you have this part done, you can dress it up in various ways that we’ll discuss next.

Start with the base layers. I used Blackberry Bliss for my base. Cut one piece 8-1/2″ x 5-1/2″ and score it at 3/4″ and 4-1/4″. The second piece is cut at 6-1/4″ x 4-3/4″ scored in half at 3-1/2″.

The next layers in my card are Mossy Meadow. I used one 5-1/4″x 4″, two 4-1/2″x 3-1/4″, and two 3-3/4″x 2-1/2″.

The last pieces of card stock are my Bumblebee piece cut to 4-1/4″x 3″ and a White piece cut 4″x 2-3/4″.

The Assembly

Inside of the four-fold card with Dandy Garden DSP from Stampin' Up@
The four-fold card opened fully

Fold the base card stock pieces on the score lines. Then, on each panel, cut 3/4″ off the top of the front panel. This creates the staggered height. Be sure to only cut to the mid-score line.

Next, using Stampin’ Seal + (the strong stuff) on the 3/4″ tab on the larger base piece, glue the two cards together. This is the middle fold between the two evenly sized panels.

The card is basically complete. It’s time to decorate.

Patterned Paper Pieces for the Four-Fold Panels

At a minimum, you’ll want the following pieces of pattered paper to decorate the card: 5″x 3-3/4″, two pieces 3-12/” x 2-1/4″. This decorates your front small panel, inside and out and the back panel interior.

I could have embossed my Bumblebee piece and left it as is. Instead, I cut another piece of DSP at 4″ x 2-3/4″ to go on top of the Bumblebee layer and finished that panel off with a dragonfly. As an additional layer under the White panel, I cut that piece of paper at 4-1/4″ x 3″.

I also added one of the memory and more cards to the inside of the back panel with a small dragonfly. Lastly, I added the sentiment to the front of the card using Mossy Meadow ink on a scrap of White layered over a piece of Mossy Meadow.

That’s it. Huge thanks to Carrie Todd for sharing this design. The four-fold card is only fussy in the number of pieces you put together. Once you have your base figured out, it’s easy to embellish with embossing, die-cuts, or even more stamping. Of course, I’m going to use this layout for at least one Christmas card. Let me know if you try it. Until next time, ink up!

Throwback Thursday Texture Tips and Techniques

Fortunate to Know You Birthday Card

Fortunate to Know You fun fold card with stamping techniques to create visual interest and tips on creating your own DSP and card layouts.

This stamp set, Fortunate to Know You, is an oldie but a goodie. The layout is one I’ve used before— get the details here. I’m sharing this card to showcase a couple of techniques or tips for you to try with your stamp sets.

The Stamping

The first thing is the color combo. It’s a little more interesting than a traditional monochromatic card because I’ve paired Real Red, a bold color, with neutrals like Crumb Cake, Smokey Slate, and wood grain in the chopsticks.

Next, I used tone on tone stamping to create my own DSP or visual texture with the fortune cookie stamp. A couple of tips when you do this. Rotate the stamp so you don’t get a row of identical images in the same direction. Also, stamp off the edge of your paper. This cuts the image off and adds interest. The eye reads it as part of a larger sheet of stamped paper, and it becomes wallpaper instead of stamped images that require the viewer’s eye to focus, which means texture instead of a focal point. You don’t want the background to compete with your focal point.

The third thing I’d invite you to try is stamping on your DSP. For the chopsticks, I stamped the image on woodgrain DSP and cut them out with scissors (fussy cut). The stamp is just an outline image, so by stamping on something that has a pattern, I made it more interesting with zero work. For the take-out box, I added interest by coloring in select spots with Stampin’ Blends. I used Smokey Slate for the handle, a little bit of Ivory for the shadows on the corners, and Real Red for the Heart.

The Layout

The last thing is the arrangement of the focal point. The chopsticks, sentiment, and red rhinestones are laid out in a triangle. This draws the eye around the card. The viewer takes in the DSP’s texture, the stamped pieces, but their eye is focused on the main images. Also, notice that the pieces are connected. The chopsticks are laid across the box in line with the handle. And the sentiment is tucked under the box and touched by the chopsticks. That keeps the layout from feeling busy or disjoint. These pieces connect to form one focal point.

I hope you enjoyed these tips and techniques and you try it with your stamp sets. Happy crafting!